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Covid-19 Dashboard

Covid-19 Dashboard

Q&A on coronaviruses (COVID-19)

COVID-19 is the infectious disease caused by the most recently discovered coronavirus. This new virus and disease were unknown before the outbreak began in Wuhan, China, in December 2019. COVID-19 is now a pandemic affecting many countries globally.
Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses which may cause illness in animals or humans. In humans, several coronaviruses are known to cause respiratory infections ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). The most recently discovered coronavirus causes coronavirus disease COVID-19.
The most common symptoms of COVID-19 are fever, dry cough, and tiredness. Some patients may have aches and pains, nasal congestion, sore throat or diarrhea. These symptoms are usually mild and begin gradually. Some people become infected but only have very mild symptoms. Most people (about 80%) recover from the disease without needing hospital treatment. Around 1 out of every 5 people who gets COVID-19 becomes seriously ill and develops difficulty breathing. Older people, and those with underlying medical problems like high blood pressure, heart and lung problems, diabetes, or cancer , are at higher risk of developing serious illness. However anyone can catch COVID-19 and become seriously ill. Even people with very mild symptoms of COVID-19 can transmit the virus. People of all ages who experience fever, cough and difficulty breathing should seek medical attention.
If you have minor symptoms, such as a slight cough or a mild fever, there is generally no need to seek medical care. Stay at home, self-isolate and monitor your symptoms. Follow national guidance on self-isolation. However, if you live in an area with malaria or dengue fever it is important that you do not ignore symptoms of fever. Seek medical help. When you attend the health facility wear a mask if possible, keep at least 1 metre distance from other people and do not touch surfaces with your hands. If it is a child who is sick help the child stick to this advice. Seek immediate medical care if you have difficulty breathing or pain/pressure in the chest. If possible, call your health care provider in advance, so he/she can direct you to the right health facility.
People can catch COVID-19 from others who have the virus. The disease spreads primarily from person to person through small droplets from the nose or mouth, which are expelled when a person with COVID-19 coughs, sneezes, or speaks. These droplets are relatively heavy, do not travel far and quickly sink to the ground. People can catch COVID-19 if they breathe in these droplets from a person infected with the virus. This is why it is important to stay at least 1 metre (3 feet) away from others. These droplets can land on objects and surfaces around the person such as tables, doorknobs and handrails. People can become infected by touching these objects or surfaces, then touching their eyes, nose or mouth. This is why it is important to wash your hands regularly with soap and water or clean with alcohol-based hand rub. WHO is assessing ongoing research on the ways that COVID-19 is spread and will continue to share updated findings.
COVID-19 is mainly spread through respiratory droplets expelled by someone who is coughing or has other symptoms such as fever or tiredness. Many people with COVID-19 experience only mild symptoms. This is particularly true in the early stages of the disease. It is possible to catch COVID-19 from someone who has just a mild cough and does not feel ill. Some reports have indicated that people with no symptoms can transmit the virus. It is not yet known how often it happens. WHO is assessing ongoing research on the topic and will continue to share updated findings.
Practicing hand and respiratory hygiene is important at ALL times and is the best way to protect others and yourself. When possible maintain at least a 1 metre (3 feet) distance between yourself and others. This is especially important if you are standing by someone who is coughing or sneezing. Since some infected persons may not yet be exhibiting symptoms or their symptoms may be mild, maintaining a physical distance with everyone is a good idea if you are in an area where COVID-19 is circulating.
If you have been in close contact with someone with COVID-19, you may be infected. Close contact means that you live with or have been in settings of less than 1 metre from those who have the disease. In these cases, it is best to stay at home. However, if you live in an area with malaria or dengue fever it is important that you do not ignore symptoms of fever. Seek medical help. When you attend the health facility wear a mask if possible, keep at least 1 metre distant from other people and do not touch surfaces with your hands. If it is a child who is sick help the child stick to this advice. If you do not live in an area with malaria or dengue fever please do the following: If you become ill, even with very mild symptoms you must self-isolate Even if you don’t think you have been exposed to COVID-19 but develop symptoms, then self-isolate and monitor yourself You are more likely to infect others in the early stages of the disease when you just have mild symptoms, therefore early self-isolation is very important. If you do not have symptoms, but have been exposed to an infected person, self-quarantine for 14 days. If you have definitely had COVID-19 (confirmed by a test) self-isolate for 14 days even after symptoms have disappeared as a precautionary measure – it is not yet known exactly how long people remain infectious after they have recovered. Follow national advice on self-isolation.
Self-isolation is an important measure taken by those who have COVID-19 symptoms to avoid infecting others in the community, including family members. Self-isolation is when a person who is experiencing fever, cough or other COVID-19 symptoms stays at home and does not go to work, school or public places. This can be voluntarily or based on his/her health care provider’s recommendation. However, if you live in an area with malaria or dengue fever it is important that you do not ignore symptoms of fever. Seek medical help. When you attend the health facility wear a mask if possible, keep at least 1 metre distant from other people and do not touch surfaces with your hands. If it is a child who is sick help the child stick to this advice. If you do not live in an area with malaria or dengue fever please do the following: - If a person is in self-isolation, it is because he/she is ill but not severely ill (requiring medical attention) have a large, well-ventilated with hand-hygiene and toilet facilities If this is not possible, place beds at least 1 metre apart Keep at least 1 metre (3 feet) from others, even from your family members Monitor your symptoms daily Isolate for 14 days, even if you feel healthy If you develop difficulty breathing, contact your healthcare provider immediately – call them first if possible Stay positive and energized by keeping in touch with loved ones by phone or online, and by exercising yourself at home.
Research indicates that children and adolescents are just as likely to become infected as any other age group and can spread the disease. Evidence to date suggests that children and young adults are less likely to get severe disease, but severe cases can still happen in these age groups. Children and adults should follow the same guidance on self-quarantine and self-isolation if there is a risk they have been exposed or are showing symptoms. It is particularly important that children avoid contact with older people and others who are at risk of more severe disease.
Stay aware of the latest information on the COVID-19 outbreak, available on the WHO website and through your national and local public health authority. Most countries around the world have seen cases of COVID-19 and many are experiencing outbreaks. Authorities in China and some other countries have succeeded in slowing their outbreaks. However, the situation is unpredictable so check regularly for the latest news. You can reduce your chances of being infected or spreading COVID-19 by taking some simple precautions: Regularly and thoroughly clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water. Why? Washing your hands with soap and water or using alcohol-based hand rub kills viruses that may be on your hands. Maintain at least 1 metre (3 feet) distance between yourself and others. Why? When someone coughs, sneezes, or speaks they spray small liquid droplets from their nose or mouth which may contain virus. If you are too close, you can breathe in the droplets, including the COVID-19 virus if the person has the disease. Avoid going to crowded places. Why? Where people come together in crowds, you are more likely to come into close contact with someone that has COIVD-19 and it is more difficult to maintain physical distance of 1 metre (3 feet). Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth. Why? Hands touch many surfaces and can pick up viruses. Once contaminated, hands can transfer the virus to your eyes, nose or mouth. From there, the virus can enter your body and infect you. Make sure you, and the people around you, follow good respiratory hygiene. This means covering your mouth and nose with your bent elbow or tissue when you cough or sneeze. Then dispose of the used tissue immediately and wash your hands. Why? Droplets spread virus. By following good respiratory hygiene, you protect the people around you from viruses such as cold, flu and COVID-19. Stay home and self-isolate even with minor symptoms such as cough, headache, mild fever, until you recover. Have someone bring you supplies. If you need to leave your house, wear a mask to avoid infecting others. Why? Avoiding contact with others will protect them from possible COVID-19 and other viruses. If you have a fever, cough and difficulty breathing, seek medical attention, but call by telephone in advance if possible and follow the directions of your local health authority. Why? National and local authorities will have the most up to date information on the situation in your area. Calling in advance will allow your health care provider to quickly direct you to the right health facility. This will also protect you and help prevent spread of viruses and other infections. Keep up to date on the latest information from trusted sources, such as WHO or your local and national health authorities. Why? Local and national authorities are best placed to advise on what people in your area should be doing to protect themselves.
Not yet. To date, there is no vaccine and no specific antiviral medicines against COVID-19. However, .people, particularly those with serious illness, may need to be hospitalized so that they can receive life-saving treatment for complications.. Most patients recover thanks to such care. Possible vaccines and some specific drug treatments are currently under investigation. They are being tested through clinical trials. WHO is coordinating efforts to develop vaccines and medicines to prevent and treat COVID-19. The most effective ways to protect yourself and others against COVID-19 are to: Clean your hands frequently and thoroughly Avoid touching your eyes, mouth and nose Cover your cough with the bend of elbow or tissue. If a tissue is used, discard it immediately and wash your hands. Maintain a distance of at least 1 metre (3 feet) from others.
The time between exposure to COVID-19 and the moment when symptoms start is commonly around five to six days but can range from 1 – 14 days.
COVID-19 is spread through human-to-human transmission. We already know a lot about other viruses in the coronavirus family and most of these types of viruses have an origin in animals. The COVID-19 virus (also called SARS-CoV-2) is a new virus in humans. The possible animal source of COVID-19 has not yet been confirmed but research is ongoing. WHO continues to monitor the latest research on this and other COVID-19 topics and will update, as new findings are available.
Several dogs and cats (domestic cats and a tiger) in contact with infected humans have tested positive for COVID-19. In addition, ferrets appear to be susceptible to the infection. In experimental conditions, both cats and ferrets were able to transmit infection to other animals of the same species, but there is no evidence that these animals can transmit the disease to human and play a role in spreading COVID-19. COVID-19 is mainly spread through droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or speaks. It is still recommended that people who are sick with COVID-19 and people who are at risk limit contact with companion and other animals. When handling and caring for animals, basic hygiene measures should always be implemented. This includes hand washing after handling animals, their food, or supplies, as well as avoiding kissing, licking or sharing food. More recommendations are available on the OIE website : https://www.oie.int/en/scientific-expertise/specific-information-and-recommendations/questions-and-answers-on-2019novel-coronavirus/ WHO continues to monitor the latest research on this and other COVID-19 topics and will update as new findings are available
The most important thing to know about coronavirus on surfaces is that they can easily be cleaned with common household disinfectants that will kill the virus. Studies have shown that the COVID-19 virus can survive for up to 72 hours on plastic and stainless steel, less than 4 hours on copper and less than 24 hours on cardboard. As, always clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water. Avoid touching your eyes, mouth, or nose.
When grocery shopping, keep at least 1-metre distance from others and avoid touching your eyes, mouth and nose. If possible, sanitize the handles of shopping trolleys or baskets before shopping. Once home, wash your hands thoroughly and also after handling and storing your purchased products. There is currently no confirmed case of COVID-19 transmitted through food or food packaging.
Fruits and vegetables are important components of a healthy diet. Wash them the same way you should do under any circumstance: before handling them, wash your hands with soap and water. Then, wash fruits and vegetables thoroughly with clean water, especially if you eat them raw.
No. Antibiotics do not work against viruses; they only work on bacterial infections. COVID-19 is caused by a virus, so antibiotics do not work. Antibiotics should not be used as a means of prevention or treatment of COVID-19. In hospitals physicians will sometimes use antibiotics to prevent or treat secondary bacterial infections which can be a complication of COVID-19 in severely ill patients. They should only be used as directed by a physician to treat a bacterial infection.
While initial investigations suggest the virus may be present in faeces in some cases, to date, there have not been reports of faecal-oral transmission of COVID-19. Additionally, there is no evidence to date on the survival of the COVID-19 virus in water or sewage. WHO is assessing ongoing research on the ways COVID-19 is spread and will continue to share new findings on this topic.
Quarantine means restricting activities or separating people who are not ill themselves but may have been exposed to COVID-19. The goal is to prevent spread of the disease at the time when people just develop symptoms. Isolation means separating people who are ill with symptoms of COVID-19 and may be infectious to prevent the spread of the disease. Physical distancing means being physically apart. WHO recommends keeping at least 1-metre (3 feet) distance from others. This is a general measure that everyone should take even if they are well with no known exposure to COVID-19.
Source WHO

Covid-19 All Symptoms

You can see a number of articles everywhere . However, the most accurate fact is that, for today, COVID-19's duration of transmission and its resistance to the external environment is not clear.

The most common symptoms are fever, cough and respiratory distress. These symptoms can be of different severity.
At the same time, complications such as pneumonia are possible. In some patients, digestion or eye there may also be problems (inflammation of the eye).

In more serious cases, pneumonia, severe acute respiratory infection, kidney failure and even death may develop.

Conditions that can be evaluated as disease symptoms:
- Fever (body temperature is higher than 38°C, fatigue, sometimes muscle novelties are followed by)
- Can be seen with dry cough, sore throat
If the symptoms are mild, you can treat yourself. Do not leave the house until 24 hours after your symptoms have eased, thus preventing the disease from spreading to other people.
However, pay attention to hygiene and code of conduct

Call your doctor if you are at high risk of severe illness or if the symptoms are worsening. It will decide whether medical research is necessary or whether it is sufficient for you to stay at home and treat yourself.

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) advice for the public from WHO

Stay aware of the latest information on the COVID-19 outbreak, available on the WHO website and through your national and local public health authority. Most countries around the world have seen cases of COVID-19 and many are experiencing outbreaks. Authorities in China and some other countries have succeeded in slowing their outbreaks. However, the situation is unpredictable so check regularly for the latest news.

 

Protecting yourself and others from the spread COVID-19

You can reduce your chances of being infected or spreading COVID-19 by taking some simple precautions:

  • Regularly and thoroughly clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water. Why? Washing your hands with soap and water or using alcohol-based hand rub kills viruses that may be on your hands.
  • Maintain at least 1 metre (3 feet) distance between yourself and others. Why? When someone coughs, sneezes, or speaks they spray small liquid droplets from their nose or mouth which may contain virus. If you are too close, you can breathe in the droplets, including the COVID-19 virus if the person has the disease.
  • Avoid going to crowded places. Why? Where people come together in crowds, you are more likely to come into close contact with someone that has COIVD-19 and it is more difficult to maintain physical distance of 1 metre (3 feet).
  • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth. Why? Hands touch many surfaces and can pick up viruses. Once contaminated, hands can transfer the virus to your eyes, nose or mouth. From there, the virus can enter your body and infect you.
  • Make sure you, and the people around you, follow good respiratory hygiene. This means covering your mouth and nose with your bent elbow or tissue when you cough or sneeze. Then dispose of the used tissue immediately and wash your hands. Why? Droplets spread virus. By following good respiratory hygiene, you protect the people around you from viruses such as cold, flu and COVID-19.
  • Stay home and self-isolate even with minor symptoms such as cough, headache, mild fever, until you recover. Have someone bring you supplies. If you need to leave your house, wear a mask to avoid infecting others. Why? Avoiding contact with others will protect them from possible COVID-19 and other viruses.
  • If you have a fever, cough and difficulty breathing, seek medical attention, but call by telephone in advance if possible and follow the directions of your local health authority. Why? National and local authorities will have the most up to date information on the situation in your area. Calling in advance will allow your health care provider to quickly direct you to the right health facility. This will also protect you and help prevent spread of viruses and other infections.
  • Keep up to date on the latest information from trusted sources, such as WHO or your local and national health authorities. Why? Local and national authorities are best placed to advise on what people in your area should be doing to protect themselves.

 

Advice on the safe use of alcohol-based hand sanitizers

To protect yourself and others against COVID-19, clean your hands frequently and thoroughly. Use alcohol-based hand sanitizer or wash your hands with soap and water. If you use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer, make sure you use and store it carefully.

    • Keep alcohol-based hand sanitizers out of children’s reach. Teach them how to apply the sanitizer and monitor its use.
    • Apply a coin-sized amount on your hands. There is no need to use a large amount of the product.
    • Avoid touching your eyes, mouth and nose immediately after using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer, as it can cause irritation.
    • Hand sanitizers recommended to protect against COVID-19 are alcohol-based and therefore can be flammable. Do not use before handling fire or cooking.
    • Under no circumstance, drink or let children swallow an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. It can be poisonous. 
    • Remember that washing your hands with soap and water is also effective against COVID-19.

Covid - 19 patient care and treatment

There is no specific antiviral treatment for 2019 nCoV and symptomatic treatment is administered because its viral kinetics are unknown. It is intended to prevent secondary infections and complications.

In patients with pneumonia and severe pneumonia presenting with a preliminary diagnosis of COVID-19, empirical treatment is planned by taking bacteria and other viruses into account. The choice of empirical antibiotic treatment to be used in the clinical state of the patient (community-acquired pneumonia, health care-associated pneumonia, sepsis, status, comorbidity, and immunosupression, referral for health care in the last 3 months, prior antibiotic use) must be made according to local epidemiological data and treatment guidelines.

Today, there is no specific antiviral treatment for COVID-19 that has been proven reliable and effective. In order to find an effective antiviral treatment for this disease, more than 100 randomized controlled trials are currently being carried out with a large number of drugs, and some of their results are expected to be announced in the coming months.

Although it has been reported that the use of antivirals within the framework of randomized controlled trials is more rational, there is limited evidence that they may be effective due to the urgency of the situation, antivirals are widely used throughout the world for the treatment of these patients. Data from SARS and influenza suggest that early initiation of antiviral therapy is more beneficial.

Therefore, it is recommended to start antiviral therapy immediately for symptomatic patients with possible COVID - 19, for those with lung graph or thorax CT imaging with consistent involvement with viral pneumonia, and for all symptomatic patients with minimum fever symptoms with definite COVID-19 diagnosis. The combined use of antivirals in covid-19 patients should be considered on a patient-by-patient basis and by evaluating all the relevant literature, and caution should be taken regarding the interactions and undesirable effects of the drugs used.

Covid-19 Treatment protocol;

  • Additional oxygen therapy is recommended for patients with respiratory distress, hypoxemia and shock.
  •  Conservative fluid therapy is recommended in patients with severe acute respiratory infection without any signs of shock.
  •  Empirical antimicrobials (antibiotics,influenza neuraminidase inhibitors, antifungals) are recommended for possible pathogens that may cause severe acute respiratory infections. Patients with sepsis should be given antimicrobials within the first hour of patient evaluation.
  • Systemic corticosteroids should not be routinely administered for the treatment of viral pneumonia or Systemic corticosteroids should not be routinely given for treatment of ARDS. Because observational studies have reported that corticosteroids administered in SARS patients do not provide survival benefits, but may cause potential harm (avascular necrosis, psychosis, diabetes, and delayed viral clearance).
  •  Patients with severe acute respiratory tract infections should be closely monitored for rapidly progressing respiratory failure and sepsis and supportive treatment should be applied when necessary.
  •  It is very important to follow up closely in terms of accompanying diseases in the management of critical diseases. There is no developed vaccine for coronaviruses available today

Id Country Cases Deaths Recov
Id Country Cases Deaths Recov
0 United States 1,537,830 90,694 288,842
1 Russia 290,678 2,722 70,209
2 Brazil 255,200 16,839 100,459
3 United Kingdom 246,406 34,796 No data
4 Spain 231,606 27,709 150,376
5 Italy 225,886 32,007 127,326
6 Germany 177,289 8,123 154,600
7 Turkey 150,593 4,171 111,577
8 France 142,903 28,239 61,728
9 Iran 122,492 7,057 95,661
10 India 96,169 3,029 36,824
11 Peru 94,933 2,789 30,306
12 China 82,954 4,634 78,238
13 Canada 78,072 5,842 39,228
14 Saudi Arabia 57,345 320 28,748
15 Belgium 55,559 9,080 14,657
16 Mexico 49,219 5,177 33,329
17 Chile 46,059 478 20,165
18 Netherlands 44,141 5,694 No data
19 Pakistan 42,125 903 11,922
20 Qatar 33,969 15 4,899
21 Ecuador 33,582 2,799 3,433
22 Switzerland 30,598 1,603 27,600
23 Belarus 30,572 171 10,130
24 Sweden 30,377 3,698 4,971
25 Portugal 29,209 1,231 6,430
26 Singapore 28,343 22 9,835
27 Ireland 24,200 1,547 19,470
28 United Arab Emirates 24,190 224 9,577
29 Bangladesh 23,870 349 4,585
30 Poland 18,885 936 7,628
31 Ukraine 18,616 535 5,276
32 Indonesia 18,010 1,191 4,324
33 Romania 17,036 1,107 9,930
34 Israel 16,643 276 13,253
35 South Africa 16,433 286 7,298
36 Japan 16,340 756 11,415
37 Colombia 16,295 592 3,903
38 Austria 16,230 629 14,614
39 Kuwait 15,691 118 4,339
40 Egypt 12,764 645 3,440
41 Dominican Republic 12,725 434 6,613
42 Philippines 12,718 831 2,729
43 South Korea 11,065 263 9,904
44 Denmark 10,968 548 9,301
45 Serbia 10,699 231 4,799
46 Panama 9,726 279 6,085
47 Czech Republic 8,586 297 5,641
48 Argentina 8,358 382 2,612
49 Norway 8,259 233 7,114
50 Algeria 7,201 555 3,625
51 Bahrain 7,184 12 2,931
52 Afghanistan 7,072 173 801
53 Australia 7,059 99 6,389
54 Morocco 6,952 192 3,758
55 Malaysia 6,941 113 5,615
56 Kazakhstan 6,440 35 3,469
57 Finland 6,380 300 5,000
58 Nigeria 6,175 192 1,644
59 Moldova 6,138 217 2,425
60 Ghana 5,735 29 1,754
61 Oman 5,379 25 1,496
62 Armenia 4,823 61 2,019
63 Bolivia 4,088 169 493
64 Luxembourg 3,947 107 3,715
65 Iraq 3,554 127 2,310
66 Hungary 3,535 462 1,400
67 Cameroon 3,529 140 1,567
68 Azerbaijan 3,387 40 2,055
69 Thailand 3,031 56 2,857
70 Greece 2,836 165 1,374
71 Guinea 2,796 16 1,263
72 Uzbekistan 2,791 13 2,314
73 Puerto Rico 2,710 124 850
74 Honduras 2,646 142 319
75 Sudan 2,591 105 247
76 Senegal 2,544 26 1,076
77 Bosnia & Herzegovina 2,304 133 1,464
78 Bulgaria 2,235 110 612
79 Croatia 2,228 95 1,946
80 Ivory Coast 2,119 28 1,040
81 Guatemala 1,912 35 138
82 Cuba 1,881 79 1,505
83 North Macedonia 1,817 104 1,301
84 Iceland 1,802 10 1,786
85 Estonia 1,784 64 938
86 Tajikistan 1,729 41 0
87 Lithuania 1,547 59 997
88 DR Congo 1,537 61 272
89 Djibouti 1,518 7 1,018
90 Slovakia 1,495 28 1,185
91 Slovenia 1,466 104 274
92 Somalia 1,455 57 163
93 Gabon 1,432 11 301
94 El Salvador 1,413 30 474
95 Kyrgyzstan 1,216 14 827
96 New Zealand 1,149 21 1,433
97 Maldives 1,106 4 58
98 USS Theodore Roosevelt 1,102 1 53
99 Charles de Gaulle 1,081 0 0
100 Hong Kong 1,056 4 1,025
101 Tunisia 1,037 45 807
102 Guinea-Bissau 1,032 4 38
103 Latvia 1,009 19 662
104 Sri Lanka 992 9 551
105 Kosovo 955 29 691
106 Albania 948 31 727
107 Lebanon 931 26 251
108 Cyprus 917 17 515
109 Kenya 912 50 336
110 Niger 909 55 714
111 Mali 874 452 512
112 Costa Rica 866 10 575
113 Burkina Faso 796 51 652
114 Paraguay 788 11 219
115 Andorra 761 51 624
116 Zambia 761 7 192
117 Uruguay 737 20 569
118 Equatorial Guinea 719 7 22
119 Diamond Princess 712 14 653
120 Georgia 701 12 432
121 San Marino 654 41 201
122 Jordan 629 9 413
123 Malta 558 6 456
124 Venezuela 541 10 241
125 Haiti 533 21 21
126 Jamaica 520 9 127
127 Chad 519 53 117
128 Sierra Leone 519 33 148
129 Tanzania 509 21 183
130 Taiwan 440 7 398
131 Congo 412 15 110
132 Palestine 388 2 337
133 Nepal 375 2 36
134 Ethiopia 352 5 116
135 Benin 339 2 83
136 Isle of Man 335 24 285
137 Mauritius 332 10 322
138 Togo 330 12 106
139 Cape Verde 328 2 67
140 Luhansk PR 328 2 111
141 Central African Republic 327 0 13
142 Montenegro 324 9 311
143 Vietnam 324 0 263
144 Madagascar 322 1 119
145 Jersey 303 27 243
146 Rwanda 297 0 203
147 South Sudan 290 4 4
148 Uganda 260 0 63
149 Guernsey 252 13 234
150 Donetsk PR 248 5 36
151 São Tomé & Príncipe 246 7 4
152 Liberia 229 22 123
153 Eswatini 205 2 78
154 Myanmar 188 6 101
155 Faroe Islands 187 0 187
156 Guam 154 5 128
157 Costa Atlantica 148 0 0
158 Gibraltar 147 0 145
159 Mozambique 145 0 46
160 Brunei 141 1 136
161 Mongolia 140 0 24
162 Yemen 130 20 1
163 Greg Mortimer 128 0 No data
164 Bermuda 125 9 77
165 Guyana 124 10 45
166 Cambodia 122 0 122
167 Trinidad & Tobago 116 8 107
168 Northern Cyprus 108 4 104
169 Somaliland 103 8 16
170 Aruba 101 3 93
171 Monaco 97 4 87
172 Bahamas 96 11 42
173 Cayman Islands 94 1 55
174 Barbados 88 7 68
175 Liechtenstein 82 1 55
176 Mauritania 81 4 6
177 Sint Maarten 77 15 54
178 Malawi 70 3 27
179 U.S. Virgin Islands 69 6 61
180 Libya 65 3 35
181 French Polynesia 60 0 59
182 Syria 58 3 36
183 Angola 50 3 17
184 Zimbabwe 46 4 18
185 Macau 45 0 44
186 Burundi 42 1 20
187 Eritrea 39 0 38
188 South Ossetia 34 0 0
189 Botswana 25 1 17
190 Nicaragua 25 8 7
191 Antigua & Barbuda 24 3 11
192 East Timor 24 0 21
193 The Gambia 24 1 13
194 Grenada 22 0 14
195 Bhutan 21 0 5
196 Northern Mariana Islands 21 2 12
197 Abkhazia 20 1 3
198 Artsakh 20 0 8
199 Laos 19 0 14
200 Belize 18 2 16
201 Fiji 18 0 15
202 New Caledonia 18 0 18
203 Saint Lucia 18 0 18
204 Saint Vincent 17 0 14
205 Curaçao 16 1 14
206 Dominica 16 0 15
207 Namibia 16 0 13
208 Saint Kitts & Nevis 15 0 14
209 Falkland Islands 13 0 13
210 MS Zaandam 13 4 No data
211 Coral Princess 12 2 No data
212 Turks & Caicos Islands 12 1 10
213 Vatican City 12 0 2
214 Comoros 11 1 3
215 Greenland 11 0 11
216 Montserrat 11 1 10
217 Seychelles 11 0 7
218 Suriname 11 1 9
219 British Virgin Islands 8 1 6
220 HNLMS Dolfijn 8 0 No data
221 Papua New Guinea 8 0 8
222 Anguilla 3 0 3
223 Bonaire 2 0 2
224 Saba 2 0 2
225 Sint Eustatius 2 0 2
226 Lesotho 1 0 0
227 Saint Pierre & Miquelon 1 0 1
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